Last edited by Fauhn
Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Byzantine-Arab chronicle (938-1034) of Yahyā b. Sacid al-Antākī (volumes I and II) found in the catalog.

The Byzantine-Arab chronicle (938-1034) of Yahyā b. Sacid al-Antākī (volumes I and II)

John Harper Forsyth

The Byzantine-Arab chronicle (938-1034) of Yahyā b. Sacid al-Antākī (volumes I and II)

by John Harper Forsyth

  • 52 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Yahya ibn Sa"īd al Antākī, -- fl. 1012-1027.,
  • Byzantine Empire -- Relations -- Islamic countries,
  • Byzantine Empire -- History.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDF590 F6
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 634 leaves.
    Number of Pages634
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15571484M

    That the Byzantine–Arab Wars would have been referenced in the legend, A Georgian tradition, echoed in a chronicle, Book of Alexander the Great. Translated into prose, with critical and explanatory remarks, by Captain H. Wilberforce Clarke. London. indeed almost exclusive, a place in our history books and in the chronicles on which they draw, that the student of mediaeval history may be excused for taking the rubric "Arab-Byzantine Relations" as a record of little more than continual warfare. The record is not untrue, for in fact frontier warfare lasted almost unbrokenly for a period of.

      I bought this book because I was looking for an up to date overview of the Arab onslaught and the loss of Byzantium’s eastern provinces. Specifically, given the alleged authors of this publication (U.S. Army Command and General Staff College), I was expecting a careful analysis of battles, tactics and strategies and an assessment the causes of the Arab triumphs and of Byzantium’s defeat Reviews: 2. Arab–Byzantine wars: | | | | | | Arab–Byzantine World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most.

    The Arabic history of Yahyā b. Sa’īd only grows in importance with Basil’s reign, and Forsyth’s discussion of the text, ‘The Byzantine-Arab Chronicle (–) of Yahyā b. Sa’īd al-Antākī’, continues to be essential reading. Another source used by David Levering Lewis in his book is the Chronicle of Alfonso III, and Olivia Remie Constable's book Medieval Iberia: Readings from Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Sources, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, Another source is Ibn Abd-el-Hakem's book (with an online link) The Islamic Conquest of Spain.


Share this book
You might also like
Thinking of You-Rose AR

Thinking of You-Rose AR

Under milk wood

Under milk wood

Shop theory.

Shop theory.

tracing of a literary personality

tracing of a literary personality

Deserts and Semideserts (Biomes Atlases)

Deserts and Semideserts (Biomes Atlases)

priority of ethics?

priority of ethics?

California

California

The Hickory Limb

The Hickory Limb

Ping Wont Share (Growing Pains (Columbus, Ohio))

Ping Wont Share (Growing Pains (Columbus, Ohio))

The modern method of preparing delightful foods

The modern method of preparing delightful foods

Analog computation based on random pulse density modulation

Analog computation based on random pulse density modulation

National costumes

National costumes

Married life

Married life

great siege of Malta

great siege of Malta

United States Catholic elementary schools & their finances, 1988

United States Catholic elementary schools & their finances, 1988

Excel simplified for the IBM

Excel simplified for the IBM

The Byzantine-Arab chronicle (938-1034) of Yahyā b. Sacid al-Antākī (volumes I and II) by John Harper Forsyth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The Byzantine-Arab chronicle of Yahyā b. Sa'īd al-Anṭākī. [John Harper Forsyth]. The Byzantine-Arab chronicle () of Yahya of Antioch help I'm searching for an English translation of the chronicle written by Yahya B. Sa'id al-Antaki I'm aware there's a book out there but it's hard to get, so I was wondering if the translation can be found somewhere online.

Like the Byzantine-Arabic Chronicle, the Mozarabic Chronicle omits the caliphate of Ali and passes straight to Mu'awiya's rule as the first Umayyad caliph. The Mozarabic Chronicle also praises Yazid I in similar terms.

However, it is unlikely that this is somehow due to a conscious pro-Umayyad bias on the part of the author. Get this from a library. The byzantine-arab chronicle () of yahya b. sa'id al-antaki. (volumes i and ii). [JOHN HARPER FORSYTH]. Episode 2 of the second series on early Non-Islamic sources.

This series covers sources from the 8th century. Thank you for hitting the like, share and subscribe buttons. The first direct mention of Mecca in external literature occurs in CE, in the Byzantine-Arab The Byzantine-Arab chronicle book, though here the author places it in Mesopotamia rather than the Hejaz.[35] Given the inhospitable environment[36] and lack of historical references in Roman, Persian and Indian sources, historians including Patricia Crone and Tom Holland.

The Spanish work known as the Byzantine-Arab Chronicle includes much material on Umayyad Syria that bears no correspondence whatsoever to the chronicles relying on Theophilus.

This work probably relied on a Greek source, unknown to Theophilus, that was compiled in Syria before. Chronicle Books is an independent publisher offering bestselling books, children's books, stationery, and gifts.

Shop our selection here. The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, or Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern Istanbul, formerly Byzantium).It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for.

The Byzantine-Arab chronicle () of Yaḥyā b. Saʻīd al-Anṭākī by John Harper Forsyth (Book) The byzantine-arab chronicle () of yahya b. sa'id al-antaki. (volumes i and ii) by John Harper Forsyth (Book.

Jews lived in Hebron almost continuously throughout the Byzantine, Arab, Mameluke, and Ottoman periods, but fromunder Muslim rule. As with any war of such length, the drawn-out Byzantine–Arab Wars had long-lasting effects for both the Byzantine Empire and the Arab world. The Byzantines experienced extensive territorial loss.

However, while the invading Arabs gained strong control in the Middle East and Africa, further conquests in Western Asia were halted.

Confronting the Flood: Byzantine Reactions to the Rise of Islam. Christopher Sawyer ' The tale of their early conquests was an inspiring one for the Arabs of the Umayyad Caliphate. The Byzantine-Arab Chronicle () of Yahya b.

Sa’id al-Antaki, 2 vols. (University Microfilms, Ann Arbor ) I, and II,following the earlier work of Siuziumov, suggests that Yahya also had access to a Phokas family chronicle (‘Source B’, see n.9 above) since members of the family play such an important part in his.

The Byzantine‐Arab Chronicle ofmost certainly going back to an earlier source, expresses this positive sentiment: When he [Muʿāwiyah] died, the son Yazīd took his place for 3 years; [He was] a most pleasant man and deemed highly agreeable by all the peoples subject to his rule.

Phillips, J.R. (), ‘ The Byzantine bronze coins of Alexandria in the seventh century ’, Numismatic Chronicle (7th series) 2, – Phillips, M. and Goodwin, T. (), ‘ A seventh-century Syrian hoard of Byzantine and imitative copper coins ’, Numismatic Chronicle61 – A thrillingly panoramic and incredibly timely account of the rise of Islam, from the acclaimed author of Rubicon and Persian Fire.

The evolution of the Arab empire is one of the supreme narratives of ancient history, a story dazzlingly rich in drama, character, and achievement.

The Canons and Resolutions of Jacob of Edessa The Byzantine-Arab Chronicle of and Its Eastern Source ; An Outline of the Syriac Common Source ; The Passion of David of Dwin ; Georgian Historical Writing Dated Arabic Writings, AH \/\/span>\"@ en\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema:description\/a> \" This book offers a new approach.

Illustration & notes - Skylitzes Chronicle - Pictures of Byzantine, Arab, Bulgarian etc Soldiers tiberiu 14 medieval art Book In Latin Book Of Kells Byzantine Art Book Of Hours 11th Century British Library Fantasy Books Illuminated Manuscript Roman Empire.

Scylitzes Chronicle (Codex Græcus Matritensis) - 11thth Century Pictures of Byzantine, Arab, Bulgarian etc Soldiers Illustrations & notes - Skylitzes Chronicle Book In Latin Book Of Kells Byzantine Art Book Of Hours Illuminated Manuscript Warfare Romans Art Museum Art History51 pins.

One hundred pages of excurses include translations of the Canons and Reso¬lutions of Jacob of Edessa, the Byzantine-Arab Chronicle ofmaterial most likely to come from the late-8th-century chronicle of Theophilus of Edessa, the Armenian Passion of David of Dwin (by Thomson), Georgian historical writing (by Rapp), and dated Muslim writings.Gifts and Gift Exchange as Aspects of the Byzantine, Arab, and Related Economies ANTHONY CUTLER For Philip Grierson Despite their ubiquity in Arab, Byzantine, and western chronicles, the part that diplo-matic gifts played in medieval economies has been largely overlooked.

There are at least two explanations for this neglect. Excursus B: The Byzantine-Arab Chronicle of and its Eastern Source () Excursus C: An Outline of the Syriac Common Source () Excursus D: The Passion of David of Dwin () Excursus E: Georgian Historical Writing () Excursus F: Dated Muslim Writings, AH 1–/– () Maps () Bibliography () General Index ().